Top 8 #WEF2017 issues as SA heads to Davos

Published, 13 January 2017 by Adri Senekal, Business Report at 07:42am

Eight issues are prevalent as we head to Davos for the World Economic Forum (WEF) 2017. The Sekunjalo Group has, for the past years, headed annually to Davos for the powerhouse WEF, led by its chairman, Dr Iqbal Surve.

Each year Davos wrestles with a set of different issues. This year is no different with a number of key themes meant to drive the conversation:  the Fourth Industrial Revolution; Responsive and Responsible Leadership, Global Collaboration; Building Positive Identities, Fixing Market Capitalism and Restoring Economic Growth.

In this wide-ranging interview with Business Report, Dr Surve outlines the eight top of mind issues that the Sekunjalo Group of Companies takes to Davos this year:

  1. Shoring up foreign direct investment in SA

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is what will make the biggest impact on our economic fortunes and attending WEF gives South African business leaders the opportunity to campaign for this.

In the 10 years that I have been attending WEF, I have relentlessly pursued the story of a country that is worth investing in.

Going to Davos gives us a unique opportunity to tap investors, change the narrative about South Africa and position the country as a good investment opportunity. It is FDI that will lead to job creation, stimulate the economy and build our cities.

Read the full article here

Connecting people

Published 12 December 2016 by Adri Senekal De Wet, Independent Online at 07:40am

It is almost 140 years since Alexander Graham Bell demonstrated the telephone to Queen Victoria followed by the first installed telephone in Britain.

Telephone exchanges followed, allowing cities to connect. The National Telephone Company was formed, then the General Post Office. In 1896, the National Telephone Company was taken over by the General Post Office. In 1912 it became the primary supplier of telecommunications services. Today it is known as British Telecommunications, or BT.

More than a decade ago, BT’s vision for Africa led the company to partner with a (then) medium size black-owned and managed diversified public company, Sekunjalo Investments. BT rooted their business expansion objectives on partnerships with visionary, trusted and sustainable business partners and networks.

The proof of that successful partnership is clear: BT grew to become a dominant-leading telecommunication provider on the African continent. At the weekend, I spoke to BT’s Africa, Middle East and Asia Pacific President, Kevin Taylor,during his visit to the country. He told me he was extremely excited about Africa and the strategic relationship with Sekunjalo.

Heartbeat

Networks are the heartbeat of any economic growth strategy for any country, company, government, household or individual. Everybody wants to be connected – from the president of a country to a sweeper. Some need the connectivity to implement strategies, others to protect their countries, while some just want to share feelings.

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Friday Files – 90 years of excellence at Livingstone High

Published 02 December 2016 by Cape Argus, Independent Media at 11:27pm

Livingstone High School principal Theo Bruinders and his staff live up to the school’s motto of embracing excellence, writes Gasant Abarder.

You may miss it when you’re driving down Imam Haron Road, Claremont, as right now it resembles a construction site. But don’t be fooled by appearances. Inside the modest buildings and grounds lies a centre of excellence for maths and science.

This Friday Files edition is not about a single person, but rather about a passionate principal and a team of dedicated teachers.

As I enter Livingstone High School I am welcomed by principal Theo Bruinders. He is a serious man with a frown etched on his face as he reflects on the 90th anniversary of the school.

Livingstone is proof that you don’t need state-of-the-art facilities to compete with the best – although it’s much needed.

For decades the school has consistently produced matriculants in the top 20 or 30 achievers in the province, has more than 80 bachelor passes and the cream of the crop when it comes to maths and science results.

“Our alumni are all over the world. In fact, they are true to our school song, We roam the wide world over’,” says Bruinders.

Livingstone was founded in an era when high school education for black and coloured children was an afterthought for the government of the day.

Read the full article here